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"[T]hey want so badly to be “hard” and “edgy” but most often the results are sour, false and cheap. DC Comics is in danger of becoming the literary equivalent of Axe Body Spray."

Steve Bennett on DC Comics (via cooltrainershells)

That’s about as good an analogy as it gets.

(via candid-gamera)

(via candid-gamera)

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-inquisitiveginger asked: Hey Gail! This is a weird question, but I'm going to be involved in a super awesome medical-themed event later in the year which includes costumes of medical themed characters (like Harley as her Dr Quinzel get up) and I was wondering if theres any female Marvel or DC characters you could think of that have a similar affinity? Like a nurse, doctor, healer, etc. It would be super mega helpful <3

moon-crater:

gailsimone:

Can anyone help out here?

There’s Night Nurse, Dr. Strange, Doctor Mid-Nite, and for some reason I am drawing a blank from there. 

This is a tough one. There are plenty of sciency ladies in comics, but not a lot who are based in medical sciences and such. But here we go!

  • Dr. Poison, unspecified type of doctor (Wonder Woman)
  • Leslie Thompkins, medical doctor (Batman)
  • Soranik Natu, neurosurgeon (Green Lantern)
  • Cecilia Reyes, medical doctor (X-Men)
  • Golden Age Diana Prince, army nurse (Wonder Woman)
  • Ashley Kafka, psychologist (Spider-Man—AND SHE IS AWESOME)

Brief bonus round: non-DC/Marvel female medical characters from other geeky properties:

  • Dana Scully, medical doctor (X-Files)
  • Beverly Crusher, medical doctor (Star Trek: TNG)
  • Christine Chapel, nurse (Star Trek TOS)
  • Alyssa Ogawa, head nurse (Star Trek: TNG)

And that’s all I can think of right now.

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haunted-by-waters:

relationship status: (drives through the night while 80s synthpop plays in the background)

(via brentkeane)

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notsodarling-:

Do you ever see something someone posted, and you’re just like NO YOU ARE WRONG but you think to yourself, “This isn’t the hill I want to die on” so you have to let it go?

(via brentkeane)

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I was around six when my dad first started watching MST3K, and reportedly I would get very upset with Joel, Mike and the ‘Bots because “they’re talking over the movie!” I would not be pacified by any explanation - I wanted to know how Gamera was going to save the day.

I was around six when my dad first started watching MST3K, and reportedly I would get very upset with Joel, Mike and the ‘Bots because “they’re talking over the movie!” I would not be pacified by any explanation - I wanted to know how Gamera was going to save the day.

(Source: mst3kconfessions, via fuckyeahmst3k)

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ifyouresosmart:

vastderp:

herroharrypotter:

i feel like this summarises modern art

The cleaning lady is clearly the superior artist. Her reaction piece, “Untitled,” is a scathing indictment of Branca’s somewhat puerile vision, a labored aesthetic yawn elevated to masterpiece through a simple and symbolic act of dismissal. The class struggle symbolism is subtle, a playful nod deftly conveyed by this promising newcomer to the art scene.
This reviewer looks forward to seeing her next installation.

As a former art history major, I can verify this is pretty much how it works

ifyouresosmart:

vastderp:

herroharrypotter:

i feel like this summarises modern art

The cleaning lady is clearly the superior artist. Her reaction piece, “Untitled,” is a scathing indictment of Branca’s somewhat puerile vision, a labored aesthetic yawn elevated to masterpiece through a simple and symbolic act of dismissal. The class struggle symbolism is subtle, a playful nod deftly conveyed by this promising newcomer to the art scene.

This reviewer looks forward to seeing her next installation.

As a former art history major, I can verify this is pretty much how it works

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whotookcheesuschrist asked: What's your thoughts on Arkhamverse Lady Shiva?

I’m hesitant to answer because I don’t really know how Shiva’s been written for the past ten years, so I can’t say what is or isn’t in character. To me, Shiva is still defined by Denny O’Neil’s take from the Question, and that version in no way matches up with the one in the game.

Swearing utter loyalty to any “Master” just doesn’t seem like her style, making her feel like a copy of Talia without the emotional connections to Bruce. But again, I don’t know if that’s in character from the post-Hush way that she’s been written in books like Batgirl and Birds of Prey, so it’s entirely possible that the AO Shiva was a perfectly fine take. It’s just not the character I remember.

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Late-to-the-party thoughts on Arkham Origins

I was a bit put off at first by how much of a carbon copy this game was to the first two Arkham games (right down to having items like the “glue grenade” which is just a copy of the freeze grenades only without the relevance to the plot), but all in all, this one might honestly have been the one I enjoyed the most.

The writing was pretty darn good, the character designs were solid, the facial expressions were sooooo much better than the other two games and added so much to the characters, and the voice acting was quite great throughout. Also, no one ever called any of the female characters “bitches!” Holy shit, no gendered slurs in a Batman game? What a fucking concept! 

Of course, the main draw for me was the villains, and generally, I was quite happy. To talk about them in detail would take forever, but the gist of it is that I was more or less quite pleased with most of them. Black Mask, Deadshot, and Deathstroke (man, Mothy, you weren’t kidding about that boss battle) were among my least favorite takes. I was intrigued by Girl!Copperhead’s level, which I found more genuinely unsettling than anything the Scarecrow did in Arkham Asylum, but she was sadly a non-character who never got any development. As for Electrocutioner… poor, stupid Electrocutioner. Way to take a D-list villain and really show off his D-list-ness, folks. 

Firefly, however, was an absolute hoot in a very “dad humor” kind of way. Also, damn, I never realized just how goddamn cinematic a villain Firefly could be. His level was so genuinely thrilling all around, it’s a wonder that nobody’s tried using him for a movie yet. It’s sad that he’s still never been given an actual motivation or anything, but I love how wonderfully corny he was in this game. 

Speaking as someone who really enjoyed the Hoskins-esque Penguin in Arkham City, I like him even better here with the improved facial expression software. The accent and dialogue is all a bit wince-worthy, as I’m not sure if anyone actually talks that way (especially where his henchgirl Tracy is concerned, calling people “numpty prats” and whatnot), but all in all, I rather love the little bastard. As with AC, this take on Ozzie is very different yet entirely in keeping with the spirit of the character. 

The biggest surprise may be how much I enjoyed Anarky. This is possibly the best take on the character I’ve ever seen. While it shouldn’t be surprising that he’s obviously inspired by Occupy-style activists (who have taken as their symbol the mask of V, on whom Anarky was clearly based), I’m amazed that no one else has really tried doing this with Lonnie. What’s more, I think the game did more justice to Lonnie’s views than any other writer to date, making him seem only slightly too extreme in his actions given how incredibly corrupt Gotham City is. I’m no anarchist, but I respect anyone who actually tries to depict anarchism as something more than just “misfits who love chaos for the hell of it,” so I appreciated this valiant-but-flawed attempt to depict Anarky. If only the Anarky of Beware the Batman had been written even a tenth as well.  

Also, wow, I really enjoyed Bane all throughout, up until the point that he became the stupid Image-Comics-refugee from the other Arkham games at the end. I appreciate how there’s now an actual canon explanation about how such a brilliant villain became a musclebound idiot in those two games, but man, considering how terrifying Bane was in this game, it’s a shame that he’s pretty much lost forever. 

Finally, despite all the hype, I too was blown away by Troy Baker as the Joker. As I’ve said elsewhere, I’m so sick of the Joker that I could scream, but man, Baker’s performance combined with the writing and facial expression animation of this game won me over big time. I loved this Joker so much more than any other version in the Arkhamverse. Good stuff all around.

All that said, I still haven’t finished everything in the game. I have yet to find all the Enigma datapacks, and at this rate, I probably won’t get around to it. Too much busywork for something which I can easily find on youtube, including one of the only mentions of Harvey Dent in the whole game (and WTF is up with that?!). I’m also near the end of “Cold, Cold Heart,” which I’m greatly enjoying. Can we just have a new monthly episode via DLC like this? That would be fantastic.

But seriously, what do these games have against Harvey Dent? Sheesh, between this and Beware the Batman, the guy can’t seen to get a break outside of comics, where he seems to be doing pretty well (despite a dead wife and a suicide attempt, but you know what I mean). 

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taikonaut:

I FUCKED UP.
DON’T LOOK AT ME.

taikonaut:

I FUCKED UP.

DON’T LOOK AT ME.

(Source: grindlebone, via captainbaddecisions)

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The finale of “Professor Strange’s Fear Dust,” the third and final outing for Hugo Strange, who had been killed off in the wake of having been usurped as Batman’s arch-nemesis by the Joker. Fittingly for a character who was obviously based on Professor Moriarty, his death carried a certain resemblance to the battle at Reichenbach Falls. 

This is the last time that Hugo would appear for forty-eight years, until writer Steve Englehart would bring the character back to prominence in the 70’s during his legendary run with artist Marshall Rogers that included The Laughing Fish and the story which single-handedly revitalized the obscure Batman villain Deadshot. 

From Detective Comics #46 (1940), written by Bill Finger with art ostensibly by Bob Kane and, far more likely, Jerry Robinson.